Negative beliefs drive social anxiety

The negative self-view, mentioned in the previous blog, is also reflected in a number of assumptions that fearful people have about themselves and about social behaviour. In his article, A Cognitive Perspective on Social Phobia, David Clark sees three divisions in such assumptions – unreasonably high standards for social performance, conditional beliefs about the consequences of acting in a certain way and negative beliefs about the self. The totality of such thinking is crippling and includes such thoughts as ‘I must always appear strong’,’ I must always sound intelligent’, ‘I must disagree with others or they will think I am stupid’, ‘if I make conversation people will think I am boring’, ‘I’m unlikeable and different’, to name but a few. This negative inner self-world was formed when you were very young and developed over the years with an accumulation of social experiences. It will be helpful if you check the existence of some or all of these assumptions in your case, because you may not even be aware of this negative and irrational thinking as it works away in your subconscious undermining you all the time, reinforcing negative self-beliefs and false assumptions. Your fleeting thought may be a belief that you are worthless and your assumption is that you must show that you are a worthwhile human being or else people will not like you and you will end up living a lonely life.
Extract from my book – Understanding and Healing the Hurts of Childhood.
THERAPISTS IN TIPPERARY
PSYCHOTHERAPISTS IN TIPPERARY
COUNSELLING TIPPERARY
DEATH OF A CHILD
ABUSE AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
FEAR
ANGER
JEALOUSY
SHAME
I am the author of six books
When a Child Dies. Footsteps of a Grieving Family
Abuse. Domestic Violence, Workplace and School Bullying
Understanding and Healing the Hurts of Childhood.
I’ll Meet You at the Roundy O
Priest, Politics and Society in Post Famine Ireland 1850-1891
Prince of Swindlers. John Sadleir MP 1813-1856
I am currently writing a major work on DID (Multiple Personality Disorder)

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